As the world’s most popular cryptocurrency, Bitcoin has become a hotbed for fraud, fraud and abuse, according to a new study.

The new research by the firm Accenture found that one in six people who use the digital currency are involved in some form of fraud or abuse, with the number of instances rising in 2017 to 1 in 4.

And while the amount of fraud and fraud and misuse is small, it’s enough to make the Bitcoin ecosystem feel like a cyberwar zone.

The findings are based on Accenture’s research of 5,000 online and offline transactions, which was conducted by the security firm Kaspersky Lab.

The researchers used data gathered from over 2,000 people who had used Bitcoin in the past year to create a database of Bitcoin users and their behavior.

They then mapped the blockchain to a “virtual environment” that allowed them to see who was sending and receiving payments and who was using their Bitcoin account to make a payment.

“Bitcoin is not just about the digital wallet.

It’s about the network,” said John Holmstrom, Accenture research director.

“The more people there are that can move coins, the more users can transact on the network.

“This is something that is very difficult to track and monitor because it’s so decentralized.””

For example, some of the transactions could take place online and some could take places offline, but the network is so decentralized that it’s hard to identify and trace the transactions.”

This is something that is very difficult to track and monitor because it’s so decentralized.”

For example, some of the transactions could take place online and some could take places offline, but the network is so decentralized that it’s hard to identify and trace the transactions.

The researchers also looked at whether people who were using the Bitcoin network to send money were using their identities to do so.

In one case, a customer sent $5,000 to a friend in the U.K. but then lost his money in a Bitcoin vault.

In another, a person in China sent $100,000 worth of Bitcoins to a U.S. person, but was able to transfer that money only after using the same credentials that had been used to send the money to the friend in China.

“It’s not the money that’s going to get lost, but how do you track where it’s gone?”

Holmstroem said.

The study found that Bitcoin transactions are likely to be the largest source of fraudulent activity on the blockchain.

“Bitcoin transactions are used to conceal money transfers, and this is not something that happens with fiat currencies,” Holmstrems said.

“In fact, the reason for this is because you have to have access to the bitcoin blockchain.

If you don’t have access, it won’t be possible to identify who is sending the money.”

The study also found that a significant portion of transactions are made with Bitcoin accounts that are controlled by one person.

“A lot of people think that they’re using their private keys, and that’s not really true,” Holststrom said.

Instead, the coins are stored on an account called a “cold wallet,” which has been hacked, and can be stolen.

“But the cold wallet is very easy to compromise, because you can change the password and it’s very easy for an attacker to get access to that.”

Bitcoin has come under fire in the last year as an avenue for criminals to get around anti-money laundering measures, such as the US Treasury Department’s guidance that allows people to transfer money to a foreign bank account, but Holmst said the Bitcoin community needs to make sure that its infrastructure is up to snuff and that criminals don’t find a way to use it.

“The way Bitcoin works is that people have to trust each other and that doesn’t exist in fiat currencies where the central bank is telling you that you have access,” he said.

And the way that bitcoin works is the only way that the central banks in the world can make sure they have this level of trust.

“If they don’t trust each another, then the central bankers don’t control it.”